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A. You’re a portrait photographer who has just received a telephone message from a client who “hates” the 18-person portrait that was shot as a gift for her great-grandmother’s 90th birthday. Come up with a plan for handling the situation. Should you meet in person or speak on the phone? What communication tools will you need to resolve the issue? B. One of your classmates becomes very defensive during the weekly group sessions when students are asked to critique each other’s work. Often, the discussions deteriorate into a heated debate. As the leader of this week’s group discussion, what strategies would you bring. to the table to keep the group on-track? C. Your company mid-level managers meet once a month to give progress reports, discuss issues, and develop ideas for future projects. Each of the 10 managers takes turns leading the meeting. You and several other managers have noticed that Neil, one of the newer managers, is disrespectful and speaks out of turn whenever a female manager leads a meeting. Use the resolving-concerns model to plan a conflict resolution with Neil. D.In order for your magazine to meet its scheduled print date, many elements of the production process have to be done on time: articles written and copyedited, photos collected, designs created and laid out. As editor in chief, you have final say over which photos are used, and you often make last-minute changes as you see fit. Your art director typically attacks you and other staffers with statements such as: “Hey, I can’t make my deadlines when things are changing so much in the final stages. The photos were fine last week; they should be fine this week. This isn’t my fault!” Use the needs-based model to plan your conflict-resolution meeting. E. Your small ice cream truck business has provided the sweet treats for a local preschool’s carnival for the past six years. This year you showed up with the usual amount of ice cream, but it won’t be enough because the students’ siblings were invited for the first time this year. The carnival’s coordinator insists she did change the order, but you show her your records that indicate otherwise. You see that she’s losing control of her emotions. How should you handle her defensive reaction?

A. You’re a portrait photographer who has just received a telephone message from a client who

“hates” the 18-person portrait that was shot as a gift for her great-grandmother’s 90th

birthday. Come up with a plan for handling the situation. Should you meet in person or speak

on the phone? What communication tools will you need to resolve the issue? B. One of your classmates becomes very defensive during the weekly group sessions when

students are asked to critique each other’s work. Often, the discussions deteriorate into a

heated debate. As the leader of this week’s group discussion, what strategies would you bring.

to the table to keep the group on-track? C. Your company mid-level managers meet once a month to give progress reports, discuss issues,

and develop ideas for future projects. Each of the 10 managers takes turns leading the

meeting. You and several other managers have noticed that Neil, one of the newer managers,

is disrespectful and speaks out of turn whenever a female manager leads a meeting. Use the

resolving-concerns model to plan a conflict resolution with Neil. D.In order for your magazine to meet its scheduled print date, many elements of the production

process have to be done on time: articles written and copyedited, photos collected, designs

created and laid out. As editor in chief, you have final say over which photos are used, and

you often make last-minute changes as you see fit. Your art director typically attacks you and

other staffers with statements such as: “Hey, I can’t make my deadlines when things are

changing so much in the final stages. The photos were fine last week; they should be fine this

week. This isn’t my fault!” Use the needs-based model to plan your conflict-resolution

meeting. E. Your small ice cream truck business has provided the sweet treats for a local preschool’s

carnival for the past six years. This year you showed up with the usual amount of ice cream,

but it won’t be enough because the students’ siblings were invited for the first time this year.

The carnival’s coordinator insists she did change the order, but you show her your records that

indicate otherwise. You see that she’s losing control of her emotions. How should you handle

her defensive reaction?